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Summer 2019

Features

Meet the three accomplished alumnae who will receive the Northwestern Alumni Association’s highest honor, the Northwestern Alumni Medal, in October. They will join a select group of 103 alumni — from innovative entrepreneurs and Supreme Court justices to award-winning writers and a Nobel Prize recipient — who have received this award since 1932.

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alumni medalist lisa franchetti
The Shakespeare Garden, one of Northwestern’s cherished hidden gems, is home to various trees, shrubs, flowers and herbs that were mentioned in Shakespeare’s writings, were common during his lifetime or are modern cultivars of those older plants.

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moment shakespeare garden
The fantastical set and projection design stole the show in the Northwestern University Opera Theater adaptation of Igor Stravinsky’s opera The Rake’s Progress. The work was inspired by a series of William Hogarth paintings and engravings that Stravinsky viewed at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1947.

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moment rakes progress

Voices

If you drive by or stroll along the lakefront on the Evanston campus on a regular basis, you might have noticed that the color of Lake Michigan has been changing the past few years. While most of the time the water is a familiar slate blue-gray or brown-green color, there are days when it turns a Caribbean blue, almost turquoise.

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toc lake landing
When you’re the child of two Holocaust survivors, as I am, the enormity of that event stays with you forever. And yet, because it’s your own parents who suffered so greatly, you find it difficult — if not impossible — to talk to them about it.

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elie wiesel
Northwestern professors Brian Uzzi and Adam Waytz and alumnus Mark Knickrehm weigh in on the promise and peril of artificial intelligence.

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sound off toc3
Champion triathlete and medical researcher Jacquie Godbe is helping develop and improve stem cell treatments.

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jacquie godbe 2018 chicago triathlon

Discovery

South Asians account for 60% of the world’s heart disease patients, and that trend continues for the 5.4 million South Asian immigrants in the United States. South Asians — the second–fastest growing minority group in the country — have the highest death rate from heart disease compared with other ethnic groups.

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indian food

Innovation

Americans throw away about 300 million pairs of shoes each year. Almost all of them end up in landfills, where they can take centuries to break down.

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innovation scoots numbered
Brent Chase knows the pain and helplessness of watching a loved one go through a physically and emotionally damaging autistic meltdown. Chase’s younger brother, Alec, was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) when he was 3 years old.

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brent and alec chase gaia wearables

News

Five Northwestern alumni and students share details on their Fulbright research, including river restoration and its impact on local fish populations in the United Kingdom, the evolutionary advances of an extinct family of giant clams in Poland and the burial practices of the ancient Aksumites in Ethiopia.

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jessie moravek united kingdom fulbright map
Last winter two beavers were spotted on the Evanston campus. University archivist Kevin Leonard ’77, ’82 MA says the Evanston campus has long been home to more than Wildcats, with bats, raccoons, skunks, “semi-domesticated” squirrels, foxes and coyotes living on or near campus.

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fox
Oklahoma highway patrolman Clinton Riggs was a student at the Northwestern Traffic Institute, now the Center for Public Safety, in 1939 when he created the yield sign as a class assignment. His goal was to improve public safety and determine liability in an accident.

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clinton riggs first yield sign

Alumni

The Scott family tree has deep roots on Northwestern’s Evanston campus, the place where three of the last four generations met future spouses during their first year. Gordon Scott ’89, the great-grandson of former University president Walter Dill Scott, and Anne Nelson Scott ’89 found love, lifelong friends and a sense of belonging soon after arriving at Northwestern in 1985.

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alumni leaders scotts

“We Will” Update

Genetic mutations — inherited from our parents and carried from birth — can increase our risk of developing diseases from schizophrenia to cancer. But environmental factors also play a critical role in determining who develops certain maladies and who doesn’t.

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simpson querrey ali shilatifard epigenetics lab
“My family taught me that the purpose of life is service to others,” says Emelia Carroll ’19 JD, who recently graduated from Northwestern Pritzker School of Law and will soon start her career at the Office of the Colorado State Public Defender. Carroll chose Northwestern Law for its outstanding reputation, journals and clinics, and a scholarship endowed by Kathy and Jon Newcomb ’79, ’82 JD helped make it possible for her to attend.

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law donors jon and kathy newcomb
Many donors wish to make an impact on Northwestern not just during their lifetimes but after they have passed, leaving a lasting legacy of support for the University and helping to transform the lives of future generations of students.

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music library
The Henry and Emma Rogers Society was founded in summer 1987 to honor and recognize alumni and friends who have included Northwestern in their estate plans. Today nearly 2,000 Rogers Society members have included Northwestern in their estate plans through planned gifts, creating a lasting legacy at Northwestern.

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henry and emma rogers