Skip to main content

Social Issues

“Kids notice race. That’s a good thing.” Curiosity and awareness are key components of psychologist Onnie Rogers’ research, which examines how children between 7 and 13 years old develop their identities.

Read the story

nu mag onnie rogers
Developmental psychologist Onnie Rogers examines how kids and adolescents make sense of their identities. A former collegiate gymnast and a mother of two young children, Rogers now has a front-row seat to kids’ identity development both at work and after hours.

Read the story

onnie rogers in class with students
The Fourth Plinth, London: Northwestern artist Michael Rakowitz unveiled a 14-foot statue of the Lamassu, a winged Assyrian deity with the body of a bull and the head of a human, at the Fourth Plinth in London last March. Created from 9,000 steel cans of Iraqi date syrup, the piece is part of Rakowitz’s larger project The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist, which uses ephemera to represent and commemorate lost Iraqi artifacts.

Read the story

The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist michael rakowitz fourth plinth v2
A few years back, classmates Hana Schank ’93 and Elizabeth Wallace ’93 met for dinner and realized that they were both orbiting around a crisis. Since their undergraduate days, they had been told to dream big.

Read the story

schank and wallace
Educator Jessica Stovall ’14 MA features prominently in Steve James’ 10-part documentary series America to Me, which follows a dozen students through life at suburban Chicago’s Oak Park and River Forest High School. James began filming the project in 2015 as a way to explore how students, teachers and staff are addressing decades-long racial and educational inequities.

Read the story

jessica stovall
Students, from left, Michael Smith ’70, ’72 MA, Steve Colson ’71, Dan Davis ’69, ’78 MA/MS and William Eric Perkins ’70 appear onscreen during the premiere of the Northwestern University Black Alumni Association–commissioned documentary The Takeover: The Revolution of the Black Experience at Northwestern University. The film, which was screened at the NUBAA Summit and Salute to Excellence Gala in May at Chicago’s Swissôtel, examined the May 1968 Bursar’s Office takeover by more than 100 African American students protesting inequitable campus policies and attempting to improve awareness of African American students’ experiences.

Read the story

1968 bursars office takeover film
The typical Becoming a Man session includes a simple game: One young man tucks a small ball into his palm, while his partner has one minute to do whatever it takes to get it away from him. Often the young men start wrestling, trying to pry open their partner’s hand by force.

Read the story

becoming a man illustration
'Cat Tales

The Bridge Project

Fall 2018
In the summer of 1988, Robert Kath ’88 and Paolo Mazzucato ’88 traveled to Moscow to initiate the first cinematic co-production between students in the United States and students in the Soviet Union. Envisioned as an opportunity for cultural exchange, “The Bridge Project” evolved from discussions between Kath, Mazzucato and students at Moscow’s All-Union State Institute of Cinematography.

Read the story

bridge project cultural exchange music video documentary
Sound Off

Sound Off: Telling Truths

Fall 2018
Four Northwestern professors discuss recent misinformation campaigns and their impact on American democracy.

Read the story

fake news typewriter
It’s August 1967. My father is home from a yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam.

Read the story

Eva Jefferson new